Front And Back Handspring

Discussion in 'Skills' started by Jayjay1301, Jul 7, 2015.

  1. Jayjay1301

    Jayjay1301 I shimmy daily

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    Hi! So I promised my coach that next year during tryouts I'll have my front and back handspring. When I execute my front handspring my legs drive forward too fast and I fall flat on the ground. No matter how hard I push off I can't land on my feet (i was trying it on my trampoline and it's very old). Then with my BHS I can get onto my handstand position but I can't perform the "snap down". What should I do to fix the things?

     
  2. seein_starz

    seein_starz Best Flyer.. on a parent team

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    Just do a lot of drills. Working on your snap down will help with both handsprings, try doing a lot of handstand snap downs, work on core and back strength and make sure you're being safe!
     
  3. CheerBank

    CheerBank Slow your roll, Sparkle.

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    Cp told to do calf exercises (basically raising and lowering heels on a step with her heels hanging off) to help her get more power in her push off.

    ETA: Rather than trying this on your own on a trampoline, have you talked to a tumbling coach about what you need to work on to achieve your goals? A good coach should be able to watch what you are doing and see where you are going wrong and what needs to be addressed for improvements.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2015
  4. Cheerleading Is My Life

    Cheerleading Is My Life Somewhere... some one.... is giving me a slow clap

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    It sounds like you need a bit more back flexibility to be able to land your front handspring so I would really work on bridges to help stretch out your back.
     
  5. Hi-Phlyer21

    Hi-Phlyer21 Best Flyer.. on a parent team

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    A few of the top problems I find myself having to fix with poor back handsprings are:
    1. Head position: are you keeping your head in a neutral position or thinking of keeping your chin tucked in throughout the skill? I know most kids learn to, but you should never be watching your hands in a tumbling skill like a back handspring. If not that usually results in the second issue...
    2. Entry into the skill. Many of the kids I have to fix tend to jump back and through the handstand instead of up and over into the handstand position. Which can be caused by a number of things. Throwing your head back and not getting your arms up to your ears fast enough and not actually leaving the ground before landing on your hands.
    3. In my experience anyone having problems with their back handspring *kind of* be doing a back handspring but the fact is that they are not landing in the handstand position. If you don't land is a handstand you can't block. Or at least you'll block but it will be too late because you're body will have completed most of the flip already by that time. And you end up landing super long and unable to rebound.
    Sometimes you can get away with little things, but more often than not if you're learning or trying to improve its because you're trying to get away with too much.
    Have a coach watch you do both skills they should be able to see what you're doing wrong and help you correct the problem; which if you've been doing them like that for a while may be a challenge, but that's typically the case when you have to FIX tumbling skills.
    If you're doing it on your own try recording yourself so that you can see what you're doing. iPhones have that slow-mo feature or use an app like coaches eye. That way you can see what you're doing and watch it in slow motion to see if and where and technical errors occur. And it will allow you to see improvement.
    More than blindly doing drills you need to know that you are doing them correctly and improving the small things I your technical execution or you won't see improvement.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  6. Jayjay1301

    Jayjay1301 I shimmy daily

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    I went to tumbling classes but my mom had to make me stop for a while because of some money issues.
     
  7. Jayjay1301

    Jayjay1301 I shimmy daily

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    I look at my hands sometimes and I never really tucked in my chin. I do jump back sometimes but I always had a big cylinder (I don't know what it's called) so I had no choice to jump up and over. I always get to my handstand but my snap down and I bend my arms to push out of it.
     
  8. Jayjay1301

    Jayjay1301 I shimmy daily

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    Thanks my bridges are terrible lol